Sunday, July 5, 2009

Abraham Martin bn 1589


Abraham Martin My 9th Grt Grandfather, ancestor of Anthoney Moses Genereau alias Jim Cummings was one of the first settlers in Arcadia and Kebec, personal friend of Samuel Champlain.
There is a lot of confusion over the origins of Abraham. He was born about 1589, probably at La Rochelle, his father probably was Jean Galleran Martin, known as “The Merchant of Metz”, he could have also been born at Metz, Lorraine, France. His mother was Isabel Cote. Throughout his lifetime, Abraham Martin L'Ecossais [the “Scotsman”], that nickname was often used at that time, as a derogatory term to describe a deserter or member of an illegal organization. It may have also meant that he had made several voyages to Scotland in his youth, or assisted the Scottish settlers who began arriving at Port Royal (then called Port Charles) about 1628, under the direction of Sir William Alexander. It's highly unlikely that he was actually of Scottish descent.
He is often called Abraham Martin a king's pilot, leading to the conclusion that he was the first river pilot of Canada. [French as the Indian tribes had been using the rivers for centuries] Although he was illiterate he associated with Champlain and Pierre Desportes, both literate and well born individuals. His first wife was a Huron-Wendat Indian living on Ile de Orleans, with whom he had three children Matchonon ("a Savage" according to the Jesuits) b. 1609 Kebek, [Quebec ] baptised 3 Nov 1634 as Joseph Martin; Anne Martin/Matchonon Metis b. 1614 (Kebek) d. 14 Dec 1683 (Kebek) m. Jean Cote' dit Coste' 1635; Eustache Martin b. 1621 Kebek
His second wife, a Metisse (half-breed woman) was Marguerite Langlois b. 1611 Kebek, married at Kebec, abt 1621, they had eight children, of which the 7th was Anne Martin Metis, born 23 Mar. 1645 at Kebek, she married Jacques Rate. The descendants of both of these Anne Martin's come down to Dennis Stanislaus Genereaux's father of our ancestor Anthoney Moses Genereaux alias Jim Cummings

There is also evidence that he had at one time been employed by Jean De Biencourt and Du Gua de Monts as navigator on the coast of Acadia, although he would have been very young at that time. Charles La Tour was also on that voyage, and it is clear that these two men remained good friends. When Abraham’s son, Charles-Amador, was born on March 7, 1648, his godfather was none other than Charles de Saint-Étienne de La Tour, who was also the infant’s namesake. This too could explain why Martin was called the “Scotsman”, since La Tour’s father had accepted a Scottish Barony after being captured by the Kirke Brothers in 1629.
When the British took control of Kebec for the first time, everyone was shipped back home, where it is believed that Marguerite's sister, Francoise Langlois, and her husband Pierre, died so Martin's became guardians to little Helene, who was now almost nine. When the family returned after the British left, they brought along Marguerite's brother Noel [another of our ancestors], who would marry Francoise Grenier and have ten children, ensuring that the Langlois name from this branch, would live on.
The Martins would become one of the first three families to be granted land in Quebec City, when they were presented with 12 acres by the Company of New France in 1635. The additional 20 acres were a gift from Sieur Adrien du Chesney, ship's surgeon to Pierre Legardeur. Abraham and Marguerite's descendants later sold this parcel of land to the Ursuline nuns.
Marguerite and her husband played a major role in the development of French Canada, and in a culture that likes it's 'firsts'; a few can be added to their credit. Eustace Martin,(this one is questionable) the first wire of a French, born in News-France. It is the first baptism which is registered at Notre-Dame of Quebec, dated October 21, 1621. His daughter Helene Martin was the god-daughter of Samuel de Champlain. We know Abraham had two other children with first wife, but they were not recorded in church record.
Abraham drew up the first map of Quebec, even though he was illiterate. Champlain's wife Helene Boulle, did not adapt well to frontier living and only spent four years in Québec. She found solace and companionship with Abraham's wife Marguerite and her sister Françoise Langlois who bore the first French child born in New France, When Samuel de Champlain died he left a legacy to Marguerite Martin, another daughter to help her "marry a man of Canada", and he left money to Abraham Martin "to be spent for clearing land".
The ground that Abraham Martin cleared was the summit of the Cape Diamonds, Known now as the “Plains of Abraham”, site of the 1757 battle, between Wolfe and Montcalm, the “Coast of Abraham” was the path used by Martin, to go down to the river Saint-Charles to water his animals.
Today a monument features a column on a square base, topped by a terrestrial sphere supported by four thistles, emblems of Scotland. The base (or lower) relief depicts the French symbol of a fleur de lys (lily flower) emerging from flood waters to represent the pioneering role played by Abraham Martin as a king’s pilot. with a inscription engraved in the granite.
In February 1649 the little Québec colony had quite a shock when it was announced that 60 year old Martin Abraham, friend of Samuel de Champlain and the father of a large and respected family, was accused of having an affair with a 16 year old girl [i.e., “conduite incorrecte envers une jeune fille” in that Abraham had forfeited the honor of a young girl of 16, what today would possibly be statutory rape, although marriages in those days occurred as young as 10]. Certainly it would be said that this "old pig Abraham" had debauched a fine “young thing.” He spent some time in prison beginning on 15 February 1649 as a result of his improper actions. Guess the rich and powerful have not changed in 360 years, its a shock to us when our past Presidents or Governors disregard our moral codes, but its been happening for centuries. These facts appear in court records that have been preserved. Not all of our ancestors were saints.
Abraham Martin died on September 08, 1664 in Quebec city, at the age of 75; and Marguerite the following year on December 17, 1665, at the age of 63. A note made by Father Le Jeune, in 1632. Eustache Martin, Metis, b-1621 the eldest son of Abraham and Marguerite, were baptized in 1621 , were the second and third children of White men born at Quebec, the first having been their cousin Helene Desportes, born in 1620, to the marriage of Pierre Desportes and Francoise Langlois.

Jim Cummings [Moses Genereaux], Genealogy keeps expanding, he can count in his ancestral line many native Canadian Indians as well as the first original French settlers.

9 comments:

Rosebud Collection said...

Good read and very interesting as always. In all honesty, every "tree" has a few rotten apples.
Have you been on Twitter? You know, I still laugh about it. I don't know how I got into it. Did the same thing with Facebook, but I had brains enough to stop them from sending out invitations to everyone this time.

Quest for Fire said...

Hi! I was wondering what documentation you had (baptismal records/marriage contracts) to verify the following Metis children (if there is an authority I would like to know to cite it): 1634 as Joseph Martin; Anne Martin/Matchonon Metis b. 1614 (Kebek) d. 14 Dec 1683 (Kebek) m. Jean Cote' dit Coste' 1635; Eustache Martin b. 1621 Kebek
His second wife, a Metisse (half-breed woman) was Marguerite Langlois b. 1611 Kebek, married at Kebec, abt 1621, they had eight children, of which the 7th was Anne Martin Metis, born 23 Mar. 1645 at Kebek, she married Jacques Rate.

Ron Roscoe said...

Etienne RACINE, was my 7th GGrandfather. He married Marguerite Martin Dit l'Ecossais. the daughter of Abraham and Margarite Langlois (Metisse). I recieved my canadian metis card from my third GGrandmother, Gokey Gauthier, daughter of Loon's foot Mongosid chief of Ojibwae/ Annisinnabe (first Nations). Lewis Savage married Loon's Foot Mongosid's daughter Shiib Margarette Gokey Gauthier. I do not have recognition in the U.S. but in Canada and the United Nations. End result I have mixed on both lineages.

Jackie Corrigan said...

What is your source for stating Marguerite Langlois was Metis? PRDH and PREFEN, as well as DCBO all say she was born in France and arrived in Quebec in 1619/20 with Abraham.

l'bo ken said...

i have a theory on why MArguerite is mentioned as a metisse
since definition sof metisse is :
"a girl or woman of mixed racial heritage "

considering that back then often the name changed with their origin, or race, or work field(Example doctor often changed for dit la lancette(wish is called the lancette(wish a lancette is a surgical tool it fit doctors), some other like one of my ancestor was brom from english parents his last name was sargent but was captured by the abinakis in wisconsin, and given to the gouvernor general of new france, his name was changed from sargent to sergent(french word for sargent) then became serien(wish sound like sais rien (dont know anythings) then changed to dit L'anglais (the english man), but before being anglais the french word for people from england it was anglois so langlois could mean from english origin, what if her father was from england, and her mother from scotland or france? dont you think there is a good chance that she was called langlois cause of that and being from 2 difference race( french/english or english/scottish) that she woudl be considered métisses. also that could explain why abraham martin and one of his bother was called the scotman.
understand that this is just some speculation from me.


also ron roscoe its not cause of margeritte Langlois that you have your metis card cause it 7 generation and to have metis card they only goes up to 3 generations if your 3 last generation didnt maried indian you wouldn thave the card.


for margerite speculation being india metisse is false since they got married in france and made the trip to new france together with samuel the champlain. so that brake the speculation of her being from indian family.

Francine Jones said...

Many young native women were sent to France to be educated and to become a Fils de Mariée. When they did so, it was common for them to list themselves as being from France.

Unknown said...

Also would like to know about references. I am interested if anyone has heard about the Indian connection? I also descend from Helene DesPORTES, d/o Pierre DesPORTES (? Louis DEPOTEAUX & Abbe) & Francoise LANGLOIS (Guillaume & Jeanne MILLET, she being d/o Jacques & Jeanne VINCENT), see that Francoise LANGLOIS is sister of Marguerite LANGLOIS (http://www.biographi.ca/en/bio/martin_abraham_1E.html) . Francogene does not give parents (http://www.francogene.com/genealogie-quebec-genealogy/003/003966.php). Would like to hear comments on this Indian relationship, DNA results, etc. Thanks.

Genealogy24 said...

Lord and Lady really need to update their blog. DNA has proven that Marguerite Langlois was not Metis, a term which was not used in those day. Also Abraham and Marguerite married in France and had a child baptized in Dieppe in 1616 - Ridiculous assumptions with no proof whatsoever as to their accuracy.

Unknown said...

Thanks to all who have responded to my query. I posted the query on 7 Facebook sites as well as a mailing list (I am posting this summary on all of them). Here is a summary of responses for my question:

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/QUEBEC-RESEARCH/2014-12/1418839546

For the COTE & MARTIN see:
http://www.francogene.com/genealogie-quebec-genealogy/000/000150.php
Denis' site above is considered one of the best one for F-C research as he lists his references, if you don't match him then check your info again or send him your references so he can correct his database.

DNA reports:
Cote-Martin
http://www.miroise.org/triangulations/ENGFICHETRI0029.html
Mgte. Langlois
https://www.familytreedna.com/public/frenchheritage/default.aspx?section=mtresults
male lines
https://www.familytreedna.com/public/frenchheritage/default.aspx?section=ycolorized

While several people said they had proof that the above genealogy in the blog was correct none responded with any type of documentation, Those who disagreed with the Indian genealogy did provide references and reasons it was not correct and I must go with that analysis. Again, thank you all for your input.