Sunday, June 27, 2010

Judge Hugh White pioneer Oneida county

Some of our ancestors were pretty strong-
The clouds of the American Revolution where just fading away when Hugh White a native of Middletown, Conn. and his neighbors Zepheniah Platt, Ezra L'Hommedieu and Melanethon Smith became joint proprietors of  the Sadaquada Patent. A tract of land on the western frontier about were Utica, New York now stands.  Life was comfortable their in Middletown but the drive to own land and build wealth was making the frontier a dream. They agreed to meet on the tract of land in the summer of 1784. to survey it and partition it among them.
Hugh White deciding to make this land his new home, gathered his four grown sons, his daughter and daughter-in laws and set out for Albany, from there they crossed to Schenectady were they procured a batteau and ascended the Mohawk river, west to the mouth of the Sauquoit creek arriving late in June. Hugh White selected a spot along the Indian path from Fort Schuyler to Fort Stanwix, were they built a small log cabin to live in during the coming winter. four years later he erected a fine home which he enjoyed until his death.  In January of 1785 he went to Middleton and brought his wife back to be with the family.. some years later he would become a judge and preformed that duty for Oneida county.  The first two years of residence in the log cabin was really existing- the nearest mill was situated at Palatine, a distance of about 40 miles, the pathway was just that a foot trail not wide enough to accommodate a wagon, Meat being rather scarce, they salted down several barrels of passenger pigeon breast, the birds being very plentiful then.
While living in this remote cabin his daughter was put to a test-I wonder how many girls could endure it today.
during the American Revolution which had just ended four years before Hugh built the cabin, the Oneida Indian were split in there allegiance - some of the tribe sided with the English burning and destroying  the Mohawk valley, one of these was a chief named Han Yerry, who now resided a few miles down the path with his family. One day Chief Yerry appeared at the cabin with his wife and a mulatto women who belonged to him-the conversation stated with the chief asking  "are you my friend" Yes replied White "Well then, said the Indian, do you believe I am your friend" yes answered white, I believe you are"  Well said Han Yerry if you are my friend and you believe I am your friend, I will tell you what I want, and then I shall know whether you speak true words"  "and what is it you want" replied Mr White. The old Indian chief pointed to the little grandchild, the daughter one of his sons, about three years old, and said "My squaw wants to take this papoose home with us to stay one night, and bring her home tomorrow, if you are my friend you will now show me".
The room went quiet, Hugh White was being called on to make a difficult decision, the mother stared in silence with the horror and alarm of though of in trusting her darling baby to the rude tenants of the forest. on one hand the necessity of unlimited confidence in the savage and the in trusting the welfare of his beloved grandchild. The chief was a man influence and consequence in his nation, but he had been a known enemy of his country man in the recent war.  Judge White told him to take the child.-the mother responded mechanically relinquishing her hold into the hands of the old mans wife.  That night was long and silent, as the sun came up the mother began the vigil, from a elevated place on the property she began to watch the trail. as she went about the chores of the day she found herself returning often to this place to stare down the path, but no Indian came into sight.  Noon arrived but no sign of anyone on the trail, it became herder to restrain her for by now she feared the worst.  Hugh White explained the indignity the Indian would have to endure if she went after him. The after noon was longer than the morning , just as the sun began to settle in the tree tops the shadowy figure of the old Indian with the tiny baby on the shoulders of his squaw. dressed in new complete Indian attire more Oneida Indian than white.  This established a firm friendship between the Oneida Indians and judge white. the tiny grandchild was Mrs Eells of Missouri the widow of Nathan Eells of Whitesboro, N. Y.
This is a true story, but it must have been hard turning her 3 year old daughter over to a man who 4 years earlier had been killing there friends and burning there homes-but life was pretty hard when your nearest town was 40 foot miles away

6 comments:

珍昕珍昕 said...

知識可以傳授,智慧卻不行。每個人必須成為他自己。......................................................................

凱文凱文 said...

卡爾.桑得柏:「除非先有夢,否則一切皆不成。」共勉!............................................................

青卉青卉 said...

人不能像動物一樣活著,而應該追求知識和美德............................................................

涵FHJK連韓E5131E育連韓瑋 said...

向著星球長驅直進的人,反比踟躕在峽路上的人,更容易達到目的。............................................................

Distressing Delilah a.k.a. jenn said...

hey pop, nice post!

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